Dr. John Snook

John Snook obtained a BS (1980) and MS (1982) in meteorology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.
Dr. Snook completed a PhD (1993) in atmospheric science at Colorado State University.

John moved to Colorado in 1984 and worked as a meteorologist for 15 years at a NOAA applied research lab in Boulder. John worked closely with the National Weather Service to implement numerical weather prediction techniques in local forecast offices. He helped to implement a local weather prediction system at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta and received a NOAA bronze medal for his efforts.

John moved to private industry in 1999, working for Colorado Research Associates and then co-founded Foresight Weather. Foresight Weather developed computer modeling techniques designed to provide detailed weather forecasts tailored for the energy industry. These same techniques were also applied to the highway winter maintenance and fire weather communities.

John continues to specialize in computer weather modeling applications for various industries, and also spends time in winter working as avalanche forecaster for the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

September 13 - Long Range Summary

This week begins with an extended series of notably cool and wet Pacific storms entering the Pacific Northwest. Meanwhile greatest U.S. heat lingers farther south in the Desert Southwest (107°-112°), but is spreading eastward in a less extreme form generating summerlike 90s from the central Plains to the mid Atlantic region. Near seasonal temperatures in place across the northeastern quadrant of the U.S. are more prone to midweek warming than prior model forecasts indicated; peaking in the mid 80s in the Dakotas, to low 80s in the Northeast. This warmer model shift east of the Rockies is largely driven by impacts to large scale flow generated by potentially 2 areas of tropical development approaching the U.S. One already formed in the western Gulf of Mexico Sunday morning (Tropical Storm Nicholas), while the 2nd area of disturbed weather is near of the Bahamas. The former is certain to generate heavy rain along the Texas Gulf Coast early this week (Monday and Tuesday), while models are uncertain how close the latter potential tropical depression or storm passes along the East Coast late week. Several inches of tropical rain appear to be the main threat with each system, but far less certain impacts to large scale flow have successive government model runs flipping wildly to the point recent forecasts are 180° opposed across the U.S. by day-10, and intermittent model runs significantly cool the Northeast during the 11-15 day period. However, 30-day MWA ensemble forecasts remain consistent in limiting magnitude and duration of below average temperatures reaching the Northeast, and even the Northwest warms by late September giving way to milder above average temperatures across the vast majority of the U.S. to predominate October. .

 


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